Untitled (1969) Ger van Iersel

Geert Lebbing
About the artwork

Ger van Iersel made commissioned monumental art and free work that he exhibited in galleries. What is striking about his assignments that were connected with the reconstruction is his artisanal creativity in different materials. He experimented a lot with new techniques, something that was common for the reconstruction period. His work often had a Christian undertone, in keeping with the various assignments he received from churches in and around Rotterdam. Van Iersel had a preference for glass techniques and symbolism, which is beautifully reflected in this glass appliqué in the stairwell of the Water Board of Schieland. Like many reconstruction artists, Van Iersel opted for stylizations. Styling, abstracting visible reality was important because it indicated a universality, separate from the artist's handwriting. Van Iersel thought it was important that art gave a human scale to the built environment. This stained glass shows a tree of life; a sculptural tree of concrete with colorful shades of the windows, which give the building a special appearance. The tree can be interpreted as a model of growth and fertility. The yellow circle at the top is the sun, the light. Perhaps with the white, earthy and blue colors in the glass, Van Iersel also literally refers to light, fertility and water.

read more
About the artist

Ger van Iersel (Rotterdam, 1922 - 2014) studied at the Rotterdam Art Academy and then sought his job in Rotterdam. There he was active as a sculptor, monumental artist, glass painter, painter, draftsman, wall painter and ceramist. He has many monumental works of art to his name and has worked in various techniques. Much of his work is connected to the reconstruction period, when he worked for the new port city. His work often had a Christian undertone, in keeping with the various assignments he received from churches in and around Rotterdam. He was a student of Louis van Roode and received the Laurenspenning and the Lutherpenning for his work.

read more